Time to get beyond LinkedIn

TalentBar wrote an interesting article today on the value, and declining value, of information provided by social networks such as LinkedIn. My own company, Xpand, are expert at using social networks to find information, however it can become easy for anyone (ourselves included) to get caught up in the vastness of this information. Excerpt from Time to get beyond LinkedIn:

Twenty years ago, you had to build contact information databases the old fashioned way: a ton of cold-calling. But this aspect of our business is going the way of $2 gasoline.

We have to move beyond this initial shock of so much contact data. Master the tools, but then move on – because the value of that simple data is declining every day. Remember, executive recruiters and their clients often know the five obvious potential candidates. So why do they use a recruiter?

Whether you’re in recruitment or any other industry that may require you to gather corporate information, there is a lot of evidence to suggest these tools are highly valuable, but are also losing their value. Clients now have access to our networks and are motivated to use them as cost-cutting methods to outsourcing recruitment.

Value the data you have at your fingertips, but don’t allow the vastness to confuse the fact that the data you have is useless if you do not utilise it as urgently as you would any other lead available in your network.

Catching the eye of a recruiter

Interesting article on KRIS.TV today titled “Catching the Eye of an Executive Recruiter”. It makes some obvious points, some less-obvious points and misses one key area to finding the attention of a recruiter.

One of the points it raises is that recruiters are only interested in the roles they are working on. This absolutely should not be the case with a good recruiter and finding good talent should always be a priority for this kind of individual.

This raises the most important point missed in the article: find good or even great recruiters who are inside your network.

With so many recruitment agencies who barely know what they are doing, make sure you find a recruiter you can genuinely partner with. Find a recruiter who your colleagues and friends deal with a lot, who comes highly recommended and meet with them. Make your recruiter your friend.

In a mutually beneficial recruitment partnership the candidate owes as much to the recruiter as the recruiter owes to the candidate. Offering your consultant a degree of exclusivity, prompt feedback and regular updates are an excellent start to making yourself a priority to your recruitment consultant. Offering them referrals is an even better way to stay front of mind – good people should always know other good people.

This brings me to my last point: know where your CV is. Your CV is a personal document and a window to your professional career; not knowing who has it is a fatal mistake made by a vast majority of candidates. Nothing will ruin your name in the recruitment marketplace like dozens of consultants fighting over representation rights or clients seeing your CV from multiple agencies. Long story short: don’t be a CV whore.